Thursday, April 16, 2015

The CW Weekly Wrapup!

Granted, the nerdverse is all a'flutter over the new Star Wars trailer, but The CW put on a pretty spicy Wednesday night to go along with a decent but workmanlike episode of The Flash.

Not that there's anything wrong with that.

Flash is rad as balls, but it can't be all climax, and this week's episode was a good place-setter, plus a nice Arrow crossover/Justice Friends spinoff with Felicity and Ray/A.T.O.M. swinging by Central City to be helpful and whatnot.  Ray and Cisco talking tech was a lot of fun, and it's telling that Felicity needs these jaunts to escape the "doom and gloom" of Team Arrow.

Nuts and bolts: It's almost refreshing to have a non-supervillain as the Baddie of the Week, and it's nice to see Emily Kinney getting work, but killer robot bees just don't move the needle as much (not without Nicolas Cage punching a woman in a bear costume, anyway).  The two main things to take out of this week's episode: Kaitlyn and Cisco have been brought into the "We should have a talk about Harrison Wells" circle of trust, and Iris...sigh.  Not her fault, but she's the worst.  And I hate when a character (especially a non-powered female) gets stuck with the job of being The Worst.  I wonder if Laurel Lance came by to hand over the crown and sceptre in some kind of ceremony.  Guess it sucks to be the last one on the Secret Identity float in the Superhero parade.  By the end of the season, she'll either know, or be Bumblebee and join the HIVE.

Amanda Pays sighting, as we shoehorn Tina McGee into the episode so we can get another "Harrison Wells isn't Harrison Wells" clue, and next week should be a lot of unraveling, but we probably don't get full reveal until the season finale.

Meanwhile, Arrow was badass!  When last we left Star(ling) City, Oliver Queen turned himself in as the Arrow, but Roy Harper jumped in to take the bullet, much to the chagrin of Ollie (and Detective Harry Dresden).  Laurel (Hi, The Worst!) gets Oliver released and they head to Verdant for a good brooding session.  Suddenly, cops show up to check out the secret Arrowcave, only Ollie's fingerprints had been wiped off of everything and only Roy's remain.  Oliver REALLY wants to go to jail!

Roy gets in a prison fight that gives me Arkham City flashbacks, and takes a shiv across the back.  Later, he gets stabbed by a cop, and Thea gives us the weepy news that he is DEAD.  And comic book dead means really de...oh, and he's okay.  Pretty sneaky sis!  Also, Close Personal Friend (okay, he hugged me at All-Con once) DOUG JONES is also in Star City as Deathgaze to rob banks and shoot eyebeams.  We needed a lot more ATOM in our week, so Ray gets to play substitute vigilante, since Oliver has to lay low.  He learns a valuable lesson about...well something, while being ocularsmacked around by Deathgaze.  In the end, the feather was just a trick and he could fly the whole time, or something like that, and Ray takes another trip to Central City, but this time to deposit him in villain jail.  More Cisco for all!  Lot of good stuff in this episode, and we are gearing up for the finale.

Oh, and Ra's al-Ghul stabs the shit out of Thea.

And finally, Supernatural has woken up and is picking up some speed with about one month left until the summer break!  Cas has his grace back, the Mark of Cain might finally be going away, Rowena finally has some purpose other than looking and sounding ADORABLE, and Metatron ate waffles!

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

I guess this is just a Flash blog for now

Not that I mind...Arrow has been solid but nothing feels like it needs to be said yet.  Supernatural has been...sigh, awful since the musical episode.  Crowley's mom should be an interesting foil, but she has yet to really do anything.  She's Endora at best, and she needs to be the next Dick Roman and give this show something to DO.  Walking Dead's finale was a great 90 minutes as long as you can just enjoy it for what it is, and not really require "things" to be happening.  It exposed some flaws, but then painted over them with the really really nice paint that TWD has in its shed.  At least The Wolves are going to be a tangible foe, and Alexandria is a Thing Worth Losing (you know, like the farm and the prison), so next season now has some stakes on the table.

Anyway, The Flash.  Boom.  The great thing about shows based on comics is that there is so much history to draw from without worrying about running out.  Also, a grand tradition of recurring villains.  Flash managed to put me on my ass before the first commercial, as I already thought it was a cool idea to give us the full visual of the Flash on Reverse Flash fight that Lil Barry witnessed when his mom died.  But then, Reverse Flash runs away, can't run anymore, oh and it's not Harrison Wells under the mask.  Whaaaaa?

We got a couple of different stories woven through this episode, and the meaty one was the Origin of Harrison Wells.  After the break, we see that the guy under the mask is actually Eobard Thawne (which makes sense, because he looks a little like Eddie), and Harrison Wells is a nice guy with a wife and a plan to build STAR Labs in the future.  Buuuuut, Eobard is stuck in the past with no connection to the Speed Force (finally!) and so he needs to manufacture a source for Speed Force (aka, Barry) sooner than the original timetable that events happened.  He jams a Future Plot Device into Harrison and sucks his DNA out and morphs into the appearance (and knowledge?) of Harrison.  So actual Harrison Wells is dead, and New Harrison Wells is Eobard Thawne (and Gideon, his helpful sidekick!).  Not gonna lie, I had my hopes up that there would be a way that Actual Harrison Wells could come back and be a good guy (and Tom Cavanaugh could stay on the show forever), but it looks like Wells is gonna be Evil Wells.

Speaking of Evil Wells, Barry has flipped from Wells Defender to Wells J'Accuser, which leads to a LOT of awkward moments as Barry doesn't trust Wells, but kinda has to in order to keep being the Flash.  Much like Wells would like to off Barry but can't because he needs to harvest his speed from him.  And this all comes to head when Wells has to get inside Barry's head, speedster to speedster, and talk him through developing the ability to vibrate/phase/whatever through solid matter.  Barry may have had some doubts, but only Reverse Flash would have that kind of knowledge, and Cavanaugh's read on that monologue was SO GOOD.

Have I gone this far into a review and not even mentioned THE GODDAMN TRICKSTER?  UNF, I loved the CBS Flash series, and Mark Hamill's two appearances at The Trickster were not only highlights of the series, but also formed a lot of the Joker voice from Batman the Animated Series.  There was so much to love: Them using stills from the CBS series when talking about Trickster's original crime spree, the entirety of the scene with Barry and Jesse L. Martin in the jail cell, sniffing the red licorice, the reveal of Son of Trickster, the read on "I am your father", evil monologueing at the mayor's fundraiser, everything.  Bring him back Season 2, I demand it. 

Now we get two weeks before the next new episode, but holy crap that "this season on The Flash" montage at the end!  CW is killing it with their first foray into "superheroes", since Arrow is street level with more stunts than effects, and I am all about whatever spinoff/spinoffs they roll out with Ray Palmer and the gang.  And Rory as Rip Hunter!  Forget about movies, DC is building a TV empire.

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Quick (HAHAHAHA GET IT? DO YOU? DO YOU GET IT???) Thoughts on The Flash

Last week, Cisco died after discovering Harrison Wells was the Reverse Flash, Barry revealed his secret identify to Iris (Earning another stamp on his “Reveal your identity to 20 people, get a free sub” card), and the new Weather Wizard got up to Weather Wizardry and was about to destroy a good portion of Central City (and Jesse L. Martin) with a tidal wave.  And then *pop* Barry jumps the time stream to the day before…

…and, cue this week’s episode.  Everything resets, and let’s see how Barry can screw things up in new and exciting ways.  See, as Doctor Exposition tells us, when you try to change the past, time does its darnedest to make things go the way they were supposed to.  Which could be true, or could just be Wells planting time seeds in Barry’s mind for when he inevitably goes back to the night of his mother’s murder.  Especially since while Flashes can go back in time, it’s yet to be seen how they can go forward in time (since Wel…Eobard is still here…but then Barry has to get back to the future eventually right?  Except maybe it happens during Crisis and AHHHHH TIMETRAVEL NOSEBLEED).  And too many parentheticals.  Ouch, I need a new paragraph.

Barry blows off Linda because he’s all “oh, I just tell Iris my secret and she’ll fall right into my pants”, only telling Iris GOES HILARIOUSLY BAD.  And Eddie cold cocks him.  Which I promise was not a pun on purpose.  Because even though Barry decides to lock the barn door BEFORE the horse is stolen by rounding up the Weather Wizard and sticking him in the Crime Tube, now Captain Cold (and Heat Wave and his sister Lisa Snart) swing by to rough up some organized crime and kidnap Cisco (and his brother) to make them replacement awesomeguns for gun-related crime.  Lisa, who in the comics becomes Golden Glider, evil ice skating criminal, instead gets a …gold gun?  I mean, Goldface was a loser Green Lantern villain, so ripping off his gimmick isn’t going to offend anyone, but if you can shoot gold out of your gun, then you’ve won crime.  Just shoot off a few million and buy an island.  But hey, it’s your show, CW, I’m not going to complain.  Much.  Hush.

An aside about Captain Cold: I LOVE his cadence now.  The way he delivers his supervillain speeches is just great.  Wentworth Miller has bought in fully to this role, and it pays off even more at the end of the episode.  Also, they really ramp up how smart/clever he is, with him having been able to understand (well, memorize) the inner workings of the cold gun, spotting it when Cisco tries to sabotage the new one he built.

So back to Barry and Cold: Snart gets Cisco to spill the beans about Flash’s secret identity and Flash and Cold have a nice secluded tete-a-tete in the spooky forest.  Barry won’t kill him, and even if he does, Cold has a dead-man uplink ready to broadcast Barry’s secret to the world.  Barry negotiates him down to “Well, don’t kill anybody anymore”, which I’m hoping leads to many many appearances by Captain Cold and the rest of the Rogues Gallery.  Okay, another side, I loved the line reading of Barry coining “Rogues Gallery”, and Captain Cold’s on “Rogues”.  Good sign for something in between the cartoony (but still entertaining) Rogues visits of the early comics, and the slightly harder-edged Rogues we got in the later run before Flashpoint happened and everything went all hooby-gooby. 

I’m really hoping that the current status quo stays around (and thanks to time travel, who knows).  Barry’s identity being in the hands of Snart seems pretty dicey, but it’s a good amount of future tension.  Also, TRICKSTER NEXT WEEK.  My body is ready for you, Mark Hamill!

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Mansplaining The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt!!!

Originally, I was going to write a big ol’ piece on The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt a week and a half ago, after watching the middle episode of the season (Kimmy Goes to a Party!).  It was not going to be pretty.  There…was going to be mansplaining.  It’s not that there isn’t plenty to like, even love, about this show.  But I…am a premise Nazi.  If you sell me on a show about a girl who is kidnapped in the eighth grade and spends 15 years in a bunker as part of an apocalypse cult, I’m going to want that premise to saturate every minute of the show.  Because that’s a hell of a logline, and definitely something that both shoos you ahead of the sitcom pack, and puts a huge burden of proof (that can’t be right, but bear with me) on the show to deliver on that setup.  If you don’t deliver, then every show could have a premise like that.  Woody Boyd from Cheers could have been a human clone, bred by Martians to infiltrate Boston and steal their brewing secrets.  And in the first half (slightly more) of the season, outside of the pilot, Kimmy Schmidt (or Smith) could be literally anyone for 90% of her screen time.   

Okay, taking a break here to go over the positives.  Because there are many, and I don’t want anyone thinking I don’t like this show.  Ellie Kemper is great, Carol Kane is great.  Jane Krakowski…is Jane Krakowski.  Solid, but I’ve seen it all on 30 Rock.  Although I did read that she came in late as Jacqueline, so I’ll give them a pass.  She handles her lines well, but it’s nothing new.  Honestly…hold on, more positives first.  Umm, theme song has been stuck in my head since the first time I listened to it.  The jokes fly fast and free, and I love the absurdist touches both in the throwaway one-liners, and in many of the actual plot/story elements.  Comparing Kimmy to 30 Rock isn’t an insult by any means.  30 Rock was a fun show and I watched every second of it.  Also, once the series wraps up Season 1 in the last 3-4 episodes, it is a fun fun fun ride, and more than worth getting through episodes 2-8.  And hey, if your expectations are lower, then you’ll love it start to finish.  Premise Nazi.  My issue, not yours/theirs.  Xanthippe is also a good idea for a character, and she really gets shortsheeted over the course of these 13 episodes.   The show is beautifully shot, and the color palette, especially for Kimmy,  really pops, even on my phone screen. 

Okay, back to griping!  So much of early Kimmy seems like Tina Fey found a big folder of unused Kenneth storylines/jokes and wrote “s” in front of all the “he”s in the scripts.  If you skipped the pilot, then most of the jokes turn into “naïve girl from Indiana moves to New York, is confused”.  Which, they also recycle that joke series when Kimmy’s father, sister, and fellow bunker pal come to town.  And I’d already watched both seasons of “Don’t Trust the Bitch in Apartment 23”, so I was already worn out on “Midwest bumpkin comes to New York” jokes.  WE GET IT.  New York is weird and awesome and changes people and etc.   

I haaaaaaaaate Titus.  And maybe I’m supposed to, so Mission Accomplished.  Or maybe whatever the character is supposed to accomplish is not aimed at me, and I’m okay with that.  And the actor really dove headfirst into the part, so there’s that.  But, haaaaaaaaaaate.    Jacqueline just feels like a retread, and her stories don’t jibe with what is going on (or allegedly going on) with the main theme of the show.  There is plenty of meat on the Kimmy bone to where whole swaths of screentime don’t need to go to Jacqueline and her story.  By the finale, it starts to feel like someone had this very thin idea for a series about Jacqueline, a Native American who shuns her culture and goes full white, blonde, and shallow, and then no one bought it so it was awkwardly stapled onto the Kimmy script. 

Honestly, that leads me into one of the other nagging issues; this series doesn’t feel like “one series”.  It’s uneven and the story emphasis keeps flipping around between Kimmy, Titus, and Jacqueline.  Then Buckley just disappears (literally), and then a promising subplot of Xanthippe trying to discover Kimmy’s secret just peters out, even as Xan starts to turn from “stereotypical rich party girl” to “secretly decent human being masquerading as a party girl”.  Another good idea, and just slapped around and then dropped like a sack of flour.  Imagining this series going on NBC and being played out a week at a time, rather than 13 episodes dumped on Netflix at once, makes me think that this might not have made it to the brilliantly weird endgame with Tina Fey, Jerry Minor, and Jon Hamm showing up to salvage LITERALLY EVERYTHING. 

There is plenty to love, and there are plenty of perfectly good building blocks ready to go for Season 2.  Ellie Kemper can anchor this show for as long as she wants, it just needs a little more focus and a lighter touch.  I like the idea of “Kimmy wants to have a normal, non-Mole Woman life”, but other than the occasional “Oh, it’s funny because I don’t know what pop culture or technology are” joke, which lost their specialness when Kimmy’s dad came to town.  Instead, Mole Woman status was almost ignored until the back half of the season.  Premise Nazi.  Can’t apologize.  Anyway, good show that should have been great, but I’m relieved it didn’t dip into awful.  Let’s hope for a solid Season 2, right the ship, and give us eight more years of Kimmy. 

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

A Slow Read Regarding The Flash

Some brief notes, since I haven’t used this in over four years:

-I assume you’ve watched the episode/series/thing I’m talking about.
-Spoilers everywhere.  Always spoilers.  I may spoil random things just to keep you on your toes.
-This is stream of consciousness, as I’m not good enough (or too good) to rewrite.
-I meander. 

The Flash is my favorite comic.   It was also my first series that I collected/read/went to Dallas Fantasy Fairs to pick up back issues of.  I have one signed comic in my possession, and it is Flash 79, and it is signed by Mark Waid, because it is an issue that means a lot to me and is the conclusion to an amazing storyline.  Also, Wally West is my homeboy.  Barry Allen was the first, and saved everything during Crisis, and is now the Flash in the current comics (I assume, I haven’t read any of New 52 for various reasons).  And Barry Allen is the Flash in the CW show that is currently running…AWAY WITH MY HEART!!!

And this is what I’m here to talk about, The Flash (and eventually, all of the other things I watch whenever time allows).  Thank you CW, for putting together a great superhero lineup.  I was a Smallville watcher for several years, until it just got too awful for me to take.  I shunned Arrow because I’d been burned by Smallville (and DC films, by and large), and because I had plenty of DC animated shows to get my fix from.  But thanks to Netflix, I blew through the first two seasons of Arrow in time to start Season 3 when it aired in the fall, and with Arrow came…The Flash.

Another aside (an aside to an aside, welcome to my writing style), around the same time in my youth that I was getting into reading (and to a lesser extent, collecting…in that I bagged and backed all of my stuff a few months after I got hooked) comics, CBS also brought forth the too-beautiful-to-live live action series of The Flash, starring John Wesley Shipp as Barry Allen.  Who plays Barry Allen’s dad on the CW version of The Flash.  Because everything is everything.  So my love of the Flash.  Great character, great writing, especially the Waid run, and I had Barry as my TV Flash and Wally as my comics Flash, who was living with the legacy of taking over as the Flash after Barry died saving all of existence during the Crisis on Infinite Earths. 

So now back to this year, and this week’s episode.  They took a month off for…CW reasons, I can only assume, and came back to DROP SOME BOMBS.  Barry Allen is hit by a wave of electrified chemicals at the same time as the particle accelerator at STAR Labs explodes, causing a dark matter wave, and suddenly we have metahumans EVERYWHERE, and Barry has his helpful friends Cisco (who I wanted to hate, but now love) and Kaitlyn (who you remember from Sky High, which is a highly underrated movie with a sneakygreat cast), and Dr Harrison Wells (Tom Cavanaugh, who you should know from Ed, which was another too-beautiful-to-live show that needs to be on Netflix and be discovered as the lost gem it truly is).  And then Not-Chris-Noth from Law and Order, Jesse L. Martin is in it, and terrible Iris (okay, she’s probably a fine person/actress, but she is Kreuking all over the place lately) and Eddie Thawne is a person (comics wiener perked up when I heard that name, and THAT paid off last night too) and then lately we’ve had a Linda Park (Wally’s eventual girlfriend/wife in the late run of the Flash before Flashpoint/new 52/whatever the hell DC did to piss me off) in the picture, which is WEIRDING ME OUT BUT WHATEVER…mostly because I want some Kid Flash at some point and don’t mind me I’m a nerd. 

Ahem, so Barry Allen is nerdy police forensics guy, and rather than this being CSI: Central City, instead he gains super speed.  And his mom was killed by a “yellow and red blur” when he was a kid (yes, those colors are obvious to comics fans, everyone else gets to wait until January for clues), and his dad (JOHN WESLEY MOTHEREFFING/NOTKILLING SHIPP) is in jail for the crime.  So here we are, we’ve got our weekly stories of “oh hey, metahumans come to Central  City to wreck shit”, our overall arc of “I wonder who killed Barry’s mom?”, and then lesser storylines of “Barry loves Iris, but she’s dating Eddie”.  And then awesome Dr Wells storylines like “Oh shit he can walk” and “Oh shit he killed that guy” and “Oh shit he has a secret room where he has future newspapers where the front page story looks like that part in Crisis where Barry died to save the world”, and then later season storylines like “Oh shit, he’s Reverse Flash (please please please let him be called Professor Zoom at some point, I don’t care how)” and “Oh shit, he killed Barry’s mom in the past”, and this week’s “Oh shit, his name is Eobard Thawne and he just killed Cisco!!!”.  Which was some major major shit going down, and two majors is a lot considering Barry had to reveal his identify as the Flash to Iris, and oh yeah, also ripped a HOLE THROUGH GODDAMN TIME. 

Flashes love time travel, and I have the sneaking (okay, not that sneaking, I watched the preview for next week’s episode after the credits) suspicion that a lot of these revelations are going to be undone thanks to Barry’s trip into the recent past.  Which is fine, and will be awesome.  Flash has bought a LOT of credit from me by now, so I’m just going to relax and enjoy the ride to next week’s episode and the rest of the season.  It’s pretty obvious that Barry has to go back in time to the night his mother was killed anyway, and it also seems obvious that he’s not going to be able to do a damn thing to stop it (although if they want to make season 2 some kind of Flashpoint alternate universe stuff, I will be okay with that).  Best he can hope for is to get his dad out of prison, assuming they want Shipp to be a series regular at this point. 

So, relationship stuff, eww, ick, barf, but it’s the CW and that’s what keeps the lights on.  The better relationship stuff was the casual way the comatose police Captain’s (male) fiancé was allowed to visit.  I mean, it’s a tiny bit shoehorned in, but I’m not going to complain about it.  Tiny bit.  All for same sex marriage.  But also for smoother storytelling.  Not as bad as “Don’t text, it can wait” from the Season 1 Arrow finale.  As for Iris/Linda/Eddie/Barry…meh.  It is what it is.  Would be much more interesting with Iris knowing that Barry is the Flash, buuuuuut that probably gets reset like an NES by this time next episode.  Although I really do want to see that conversation happen for real at some point. 

Some brief notes, since next week’s episode pretty much takes care of itself – no speculation needed.  Loving Wentworth Miller as Len Snart/Captain Cold.  I love the Rogues, I love the classic Rogues, I love the other Rogues, I love the terrible Rogues that other Rogues make fun of.  We’re only missing Mirror Master of the Classic Rogues, and I really REALLY want Abra-Cadabra on this show, probably Season 2.  Also very happy about the casting of Mark Hamill as Classic Trickster (plus whoever the new Trickster will be).  James Jesse was a fun character in the comics run, and along with Pied Piper, it’ll be good to have some potential villains turned allies for Team Flash (comics spoiler based speculation, obviously).  Firestorm had a difficult birthing process, but left on a good note.  With Flash and Arrow on TV, I really lament the presence of a good Green Lantern (either a watchable movie or a TV version) to complete the trio…plus Flash/Green Lantern is such a good duo, and robs me of the potential Grodd/Hector Hammond crossover fun.  But hey, Season 5, right?  I need it all though, Speed Force, Kid Flash, Impulse, Johnny Quick, the Kilg%re, everything.  Years to go though, and with the ratings that Arrow and Flash are getting, I’ll hopefully get every bit of it.  Don’t be afraid to throw some script work at Mark Waid of Bill Messner-Loebs either.  This is some good street-level superheroics going on, and I’m thrilled with how well they’ve nailed both characters tonally at this point in the respective series. 

As for next time, maybe I’ll do some quick hits on what I’m currently watching, plus I’ve crossed a few series off my Netflix queue (finished, not given up on), and I’m working my way through Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt and I have thoughts on new Community as well. 


Tuesday, November 29, 2011

You have The Walking Dead to thank for this

Yes, the Walking Dead mid-season finale (Seasonette?) has driven to blog again. To be honest, there's a pantload of good TV happening right now, I'm just lazy and have been putting most of my TV thoughts on Facebook. However, since "spoiling plots" is the new "punching babies", I figured I'd toss some thoughts in here. In fact, I'm rambling this long just to keep any spoilers from showing up in the little preview that pops up when I link this to my Facebook. This should be long enough...

Okay, so WTF SOPHIA!!!

Ahh, out of my system. Okay, so Season 2.1 of The Walking Dead is in the books, and oh how the opinions are flowing. First off, this season was so slow, the title should be changed to the Strolling Dead (zing!). Look, I like character development as much as the next guy, but that can be done through actions, not just through casual conversation in the middle of the apocolypse. it started with the 90 minute premiere, which could have been a nice tight hour long story, but instead got padded out with nowhere to go because it still had to have Carl getting shot as the cliifhanger. In fact, every episode has been starting to feel like a lot of padding, and then a big reveal at the end to make us forget about how often we checked our Twitter feeds during an extended monologue (well, with this cast, monodrawl). Someone tell Shane that he's not Gambit, please?

TWD has been doing some good things this season, I'm not here to crap all over what is a really good times. Season one was an amazing piece of storytelling, and Season two has had plenty of moments. More importantly, it's success will let other comic stories have a chance to break into TV and get recognition for the merits of the stories being told by their creators. However, just because it's the trailblazer, doesn't mean it gets a free pass. If the audience goes away, then the genre is in trouble. I want this show to succeed very badly. I criticize because I love.

The real problem I've had with this season has been the pacing. The last seven episodes could have been done as a tight, riveting four episodes (five max) and really kept people on the edge of their seats. Now, I don't know if this is a casualty of the split season, although I can see it being a factor. I can see where filming half a season all in one location could be cost-effective. Just like the premiere looked to be "Let's start with the CDC blowing up, end with Carl getting shot, and then we have 80 more minutes to kill", this season looked like "Okay, we're going to have Sophia get lost, have her turn up as a zombie at the end, and now we've got 6.8 episodes worth of stuff to have happen". Now, I've read the comics, but it was a marathon weekend of reading while stuck in bed sick, so I'm not going to be able to quote chapter and verse. However, Sophia doesn't die/become a zombie in the comics. Which is awesome that they've decided to split the story off from the comics. They are two different mediums with different demands on a creative staff, so being able to follow the comics as a framework, but deviate when necessary, will work out great. Except for nerds. You know who you are...and Ogre is coming for you. That was a great "gotcha" moment in a show that lives and dies by them. It also set up a great character moment (but I'll get to that later). However, that mile marker was set waaaaaaay too far ahead in the episode list. There just wasn't enough meat in this story. It wasn't all bad though, and I'll go ahead and split those up now.

The good: Shane's slow burn into Dark Shane. I'm trying to think of a good parallel for Shane by this point in the story. Season one, he was this sad sack, pining for Lori (WHY DUDE? SERIOUSLY?) and trying to make things up to a gloriously unaware Rick. Season two, we get the slow descent into...well, not madness. Not evil. This is a new world (like Dale said...ugh, later for you Dale), and one of the themes in TWD is how do we maintain what makes us civilized in a world past civilization. Rule of law is pretty much over, except the bubble of it that exists in a radius from Rick's sheriff hat. Survival is a primal instinct, and although modern Man is able to hold that back in favor of manners and genteel behavior, that survival instinct is still bubbling away in the lizard portion of our brains, and Shane's is closer to the surface than anyone else (except Daryl...more on him soon). Shane is the one with the clearest picture of what Zombie Earth is all about, and that's staying alive. As long as Walkers are still around, normal rules don't apply. We see that when Shane and Otis make a medical supply run to help save Carl. In a buddy cop movie, Shane and Otis cover each other, lay their lives on the line for each other, and both manage to make it back to the farm. In Shane's world, Otis is a means to an end, the end of Shane's (and Carl's) survival. Granted, there's also a little Biblical vengeance, as Shane balances the books for Otis' shooting of Carl. But I believe that even had Otis not shot Carl, Shane would still have sacrificed Otis in a heartbeat in order to save his own life. It's no accident that Rick and Shane are cops; the police maintain order in society, and now society has become chaos. Rick is holding onto his old life, and Shane is embracing the chaos (which would be a badass name for a band).

Daryl: Congratulations TWD, you found yourself a Sawyer. Man, remember when Daryl was a racist, and his brother was also a racist, and Rick left his brother to die? Remember that? Cause apparently Daryl doesn't. Don't get me wrong, current Daryl is just an absolute joy to have on my tv screen. But Season 1 Daryl is an intriguing character who has so many conflicts and can't be trusted. Season 1 Daryl is holding on to old prejudices for no good reason other than cause he was raised that way (and because Merle haaaaaaaaaates the blacks). Season 2 Daryl saved T-Dogg without even thinking about how racist he used to be in Season 1. Season 2 Daryl gives T-Dogg his brother's (you know, the racist) stash of antibiotics without even a token mention of "Boy, my brother, you know, the racist, sure would be upset at me giving his drugs to a black guy, because of how racist he was". I'm not saying that I miss how many racists used to be on tv, but there are some good stories you can tell about how old prejudices (like old morals, etc) just kind of disappear in the new Zombie world. Daryl is still a great character, and I'm digging the hell out of just about any scene he's in (maybe the exception of some of the bits where he hallucinates Merle), I just wish they'd stuck to their guns a little in keeping his character consistent and letting him naturally evolve as a person, rather than just hope that a year long hiatus would make us all forget a few of his less marketable character traits.

Glenn and Maggie: Loves me some Glenn. Loves me some Maggie. Their scenes together have been great, and didn't feel forced at all. The two trips to the pharmacy (first to schtupp, second to almost have Maggie killed by a Walker) were fun scenes on their own that also advanced a lot of story. Maggie giving Glenn some backbone (Walker-bait is such a great nickname), and Glenn inadvertently showing Maggie that Walkers are dangerous. Glenn finding the barn. The look that Maggie gives Glenn during the final scene at the barn. Great moments, and I look forward to many more seasons of Glenn and Maggie.

The bad: Dale. Sigh. I love Dale and I want to continue loving Dale. And honestly, Dale's been great most of the season. But the last two, what happened? There's something called "the dumb ball", where a tv character will have to do or say something incredibly dumb and/or out of character simply to advance that week's plot. It's not great writing, and I'm sure it may be unavoidable in some cases. But man, Dale goes from a fairly even keeled guy, to making two incredibly bonehead moves. I'll forgive his first confrontation with Shane. He did witness Shane pointing a gun at Rick's head all the way back in Season 1. And then there was Otis, although I'm hard pressed to find anything Shane said or did to make anyone actually suspicious of him and his version of how events transpired that night. Now, Dale could be jealous of the attention Andrea has been giving to Shane, but that's not really been established (and if it has, I missed it), that's a dead end. Finally, there seems to be no rational reason for why Dale would take the guns and hide them in the swamp. That was just ridiculous without a rationale from the character. It just looked like an excuse to get Shane and Dale far enough away from everyone else and show that...what, that Dale won't kill Shane? That Shane is crazy? That Dale now knows Shane is crazy? Will Dale tell Rick? Sighhhhh. Dale, you used to be cool. Sadly, if we ever do get an explanation, it'll probably be in the longest, most expositionallyist way possible.

Lori: Man, I am just getting tired of Lori. Just in general, really. Here's Lori this season: "I am sad that Carl is spending four episodes deciding whether to die or not. Now I am sad because I have baby up in me". And there you go. Give her something to do, and to do without the histronics. The show grinds to a halt when Lori gives an impassioned speech or a tearful speech, or a bitchy speech. Do better.

Sophia: Specifically, the MacGuffin that weighed down this season and kept it from really feeling like Season 1 did. There's no urgency. There's no emotional attachment for the audience. This isn't someone we like, this is just an artificial reason to stop down the travel so we can spend all Seasonette in one location. We got terrible scenes with Carol, we got several variations on a very tired "she's probably dead, we should move on/no she's alive, we have to find her" argument over and over again, and we got anchored to Herschel's farm for a BAD REASON. Would it have been so hard for them to build a season on "This farm sure looks like a great place to stay and be safe"? Shane can still want to move on by himself, Daryl can still find a reason to go all Bear Grylls in the woods, and Rick can still have long fruitless conversations with Herschel about sticking around and surviving. Seven episodes of "Hey, you find Sophia yet?" just exhausted the audience's store of caring for a minor character who many couldn't even pick out of a lineup. It was a tortured setup that existed only for one (admittedly kickass) scene at the end, which then became somewhat anticlimactic because it had been so long since we'd seen her. Hell, not like I could remember what she was wearing or anything, and all people look alike once they're undead. If it wasn't for the terrible haircut (must be genetic), I wouldn't have known it was her...well, except for how obvious it was that they'd have to address Sophia before the end of the finale. It was a shaggy dog joke, not gripping suspense.

I will say, though, that the final scene was kickass, mostly in the sense of "finally, shit's going to happen". Shane finally goes all Wolverine, Herschel all sad, Rick unable to do anything because he's holding a Walker, Andrea stepping right next to Shane to start shooting, Carl's reaction, all of it really worked out as a finale. And Rick stepping up to do the dirty work with Sophia was a great moment; the reinforcement that no matter how primal Shane has become, Rick is still the Man In Charge. Although, nitpicking, I would have had Carl make the kill shot. But there's still time for Carl...oh yes.

So now we've got our winter break, and some questions to answer when next we meet in February. What will Herschel's reaction be? Will Dale spill the beans about Shane? Does T-Dogg get paid the same as the rest of the cast? And where the hell is Michonne already?

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

Summer sucks

Don't get me wrong, I enjoy the summer series, and between those and Season two of Dexter, I've been enjoying my summer watching. I haven't even thought about what the new fall season will bring yet. On the other hand, the air conditioning sucks at work, and the last thing I want to do is slave over a hot keyboard while in a muggy office. So, still trying to update, but my brain is...soggy?

Leverage is a good place to start this week, as it was a little of a letdown after last week's amazing amazing episode, but it still holds its own overall. Also, we get back into the Damien Moreau plot, as Team Leverage goes after one of his subordinates, a gentleman who smuggles antiquities as a money laundering/fundraising scheme; the money then going to fund drugs and wars and such. In the process of trying to nail him at the airport, a little girl gets caught as an art mule, and the team has to shift gears and try to nail him in England. Hey, that's where Sophie's from!

So the gang sets up at an art auction and Nate goes in to try to make contact with the mark while Sophie uses her grifter powers to try and find the guy's heart's desire. Nate takes half a beating before Sophie connects the dots and realizes that the guy has a royalty fetish. Sophie comes in as a Duchess and sets the hook on the new con, tempting him with a lost barony in exchange for his smuggling prowess.

I can't decide what my favorite part of the episode is: It's a three way race between Hardison fabricating a convincing fake diary out of authentic ingredients, Sophie's acting throughout the episode, or Parker actually using the "Does this rag smell like chloroform?" gag. Next week is the "summer finale", as the gang will be back around Christmas to wrap up this storyline (probably).

Eureka has embraced the changes stemming from the time travel stuff, so it's almost jarring to see that the mysterious group from last week has rebuilt the bridge device. Looks like Dr. Grant is supposed to go back and use his future knowledge to make the world a better place...but that doesn't sound sinister enough, so I'm sure something else is in the works. The hallucinations that the time travel pals were seeing made for an interesting episode, especially since we got the return of Tess AND Trevor Blake. Man, I missed him more than I thought, and he made the most of it in the time he had back. Poor poor Carter. Fargo being tormented by a ten-year girl was good times all the way through. And now, we see what the mystery group wants...and when do we get Felicia Day?

Warehouse 13 dialed up the darkness this week, as Artie's NSA past catches up with him. Torquemada's chain is a bitch of an artifact too, seriously. The board from the Titanic wasn't much gentler either, though. In the end, though, we get H.G. Wells reinstated as a Warehouse agent, which Artie is none too pleased about. I'm not quite sure where this is going, but I'm sure Wells has an ulterior motive. There's stil the other objects she stole from the Escher vault, plus she seems just a little too helpful.

Oh, and Claudia got some resolution in her storyline. Turns out, Todd isn't a bad guy, just in the witness protection program, and so not allowed to fall in love. Oh, teen love! Todd and Claudia get to do some major league snogging before he has to get relocated, but don't be surprised to see that storyline pop up again before the end of the season. Until then, we have Artie and H.G. to have fun with.

Hmm, that's actually it. Psych is coming up, and an Amanda-less Top Chef. Masterchef hasn't been terrible, but it's so intolerably slow, I can't imagine watching it live, without the opportunity to skip past the boring or redundant bits. Dexter remains excellent though, especially with Jaime Murray (aka, H.G. Wells, aka that hot girl from Hustle). I'll have to start looking at the fall schedule soon too.